Department of Health Sciences

About the department

A feasibility study was commissioned in 1998 to assess the need for a Department of Health Sciences. The study included an international team of experts and professionals who included doctors, nurses, educators and managers. The team conducted a survey in several African countries and positive responses were received from countries such as Angola, Burundi, Sierra Leone, Kenya and Zimbabwe. Due to the positive responses the Department of Health Scinces was opened in 2003 and funded by USAID; starting with the Post Basic Bachelor of Science in Nursing (BSN) degree in 2004, followed by the Master of Public Health (MPH) in 2005, the Bachelor of Health Services Management Degree in 2006, and the Bachelor of Medical Laboratory Science that started in 2013.  All the four programmes are accredited by the licensing bodies in Zimbabwe and the countries of students ‘origin. The Department has been able to attract students from across African countries such as Malawi, Zambia, Burundi, Sudan, Nigeria, Ghana, Democratic Republic of Congo, Liberia, Sierra Leone, Cameroon, South Sudan, Kenya and Mozambique


The Vision of the Department of Health Sciences is to become a Department of choice for applicants wishing to be trained in any health care profession nationally, regionally and internationally. The Department aspires to become a world class Department for developing Health Care leadership in Africa.

The mission of the Department of Health Sciences is to develop a leadership cadre of medical, nursing and community health practitioners who will be able to function adequately in sub-Sahara African countries as health care practitioners, and coordinators of prevention and control programmes targeted at diseases of public health importance, including HIV/AIDS.

Basic Entry Requirements

5 'O' level passes or equivalent including English language and Mathematics. In addition, the student must have a pass in Chemistry and either Biology, Physics or Physical Science at “A” level or equivalent.
Alternatively, admission may be granted to holders of a Diploma in Food Technology, Food Science and Nutrition, Food and Nutrition or City and Guilds from a recognized Institution. Agriculture diploma holders with “O” level Biology, Chemistry and Physics or Physical Science and Food and Nutrition will also be admitted.

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Basic Entry Requirements

5 ‘O’ level passes including English Language, Mathematics, Biology and any two subjects from the following: Chemistry, Physics, Biology, Geography, Statistics, Integrated Science, Accounts, Commerce, Computer Studies and Business Studies. At least two GCE Advanced Level passes in any two of the following subjects: Biology, Geography, Chemistry, Physics, Accounting, Mathematics, Statistics, Economics and Management of Business.

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Basic Entry Requirements

5 ‘O’ level passes including English Language and Mathematics. At least two GCE Advanced level passes in Science subjects or equivalent. Holders of Diplomas in relevant areas may be considered for admission.

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Basic Entry Requirements

5 ‘O’ level passes at grade ‘C’ or better including English Language, Mathematics and Biology at ‘O’ and ‘A’ level or equivalent. A Diploma in Nursing and minimum of two years work experience. Must be registered to practice as a nurse by the Nurses Council or appropriate Health Professions Board. All international applicants must be registered with Nurse Council of Zimbabwe before joining the programme.

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Basic Entry Requirements

A good health related first degree and 2 years Post Bachelor professional experience in a relevant area.

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Basic Entry Requirements

A good related first degree in a relevant area.

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Basic Entry Requirements

A good masters degree in a relevant area.

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Research and outreach

Abstract

The project is an extensive collaboration that looks at the patterns and determinants of community sourcing and use of antimalarial drugs in Mutasa District during experiences of malarial episodes.t

Participants in the Research

All-age resident communities affected by malaria .

Funding

NIH ICEMR

Abstract

This multi-partner research programme is a collaboration between Africa University, Ministry of Health & Child Care, USAID Zimbabwe Assisted Programme in Malaria (ZAPIM), PMI and CDC Atlanta, with the goal of establishing malaria and vector molecular surveillance capability at Africa University. The molecular surveillance programme affords technical support for ZAPIM malaria control programme operations in Mutasa and other malaria-affected districts of Zimbabwe.

Partipants in the Research

All-age residents of malaria-affected districts in Zimbabwe covered by the ZAPIM programme.

Funding

USAID/PMI/ZAPIM

Participants in the Research

Home Based Care Volunteers, health care providers, community in Rural and farm areas

Abstract

Introduction: Diarrhoea outbreak was reported to City Health Department on 18th of January 2016. The cases came from Roosevelt Girls High School which is situated in the Eastern District of Harare. The outbreak was investigated to determine the risk factors associated with the diarrhoea, to describe the outbreak by person, place and time and make recommendations to responsible authorities.

Methods: 1: 1 unmatched case control study was conducted. A case was defined as a student who was a boarder at Roosevelt Girls High School from the 11th of January 2016 to the 14th of January 2016 who developed sudden onset of diarrhoea with or without vomiting, abdominal cramps, abdominal pains and or nausea after consumption of food at the dining hall. A control was defined as a student who was a boarder at Roosevelt Girls High School on the 11th of January 2016 to the 14th of January 2016 and ate at the dining hall with no history of diarrhoea, vomiting, abdominal cramps, abdominal pains and nausea. A structured interviewer administered questionnaire was used to collect data. Analysis was done using the Epi info version 7.

Results: Fifty one cases and fifty one controls were interviewed. Independent determinants of contracting diarrhoea were through eating coleslaw salad [0R=10.32 (95% CI 2.88: 37.68)] and having roast chicken [OR= 6.67 (95% CI 2.87: 21.980)] and eating beef stew was found to be protective [OR=0.24 (95% CI 0.07: 0.71)]. Control measures instituted included use of aqua tablets to treat water, Medical examinations for food handlers, health education and good food hygiene practices.

Discussion: Eating roast chicken and coleslaw salad were risk factors for contracting diarrhoea. It was recommended that food handlers be medically examined annually, food handlers should maintain the hot chain of food after cooking and serve the food whilst hot to students and install online chlorination of the school borehole.

Key words: Diarrhoea, Roosevelt Girls High School and risk factors

Participants in the Research

Boarders at Roosevelt Girls High School from the 11th of January 2016 to the 14th of January 2016 who developed sudden onset of diarrhoea with or without vomiting, abdominal cramps, abdominal pains and or nausea after consumption of food at the dining hall. A control was defined as a student who was a boarder at Roosevelt Girls High School on the 11th of January 2016 to the 14th of January 2016 and ate at the dining hall with no history of diarrhoea, vomiting, abdominal cramps, abdominal pains and nausea.

Abstract

An estimated 3000 women die every year in Zimbabwe during child birth and at least 1.23% of GDP is lost annually due to maternal complications. Maternal mortality has worsened by 28% from 1990 to 2010. Most of what needs to be done is known. Past efforts have managed to sustain high levels of ANC visits among pregnant women and skilled birth deliveries yet maternal mortality estimates remain high. While innovative thinking supported by a stronger vital registration system is needed for progress towards reducing maternal mortality, quality of care in maternal health services seems to be the missing link. In addition, there is need to progressively expanded the scope and entitlements of maternity protection and provide perspectives for malaria control policy and action. Many malaria maternal deaths have been recorded though they have been on treatment

Participants in the Research

Maternal Death certificates, stakeholders and maternity in-charges in Manicaland Hospitals

Abstract

The overall goal of the study is to establish the distribution and determinants of maternal deaths in the province so as to come up with appropriate intervention

Participants in the Research

Desk review of provincial records doctors and nurses working in female and maternity wards at Mutare Provincial Hospital.

Abstract

This is a 2 phase study being carried out as my Doctoral thesis Phase 1 of the study is examines the factors contributing to delay in deciding to seek care amongst pregnant women in Mutare district through an exploration of the familial, socio cultural, economic, religious and health system influences on home/community based deliveries in the district. The purpose of Phase 2 is to develop a model for understanding factors that contribute to home-based and/or community-based deliveries amongst pregnant women in Mutare District

Partipants in the Research

Separate categories of Pregnant and none pregnant women of child bearing age, elderly women and men in Mutare District.

Academic Staff

MRS. WIETSKE MUSHONGA

Email: mushongaw@africau.edu

Ext: 1271

Qualifications
  1. Medical Laboratory Scientist ( Medical Laboratory and Clinical Scientists Council of Zimbabwe)
  2. Medical Laboratory Technologist ( Netherlands Institute of Medical Laboratory Personnel )
  3. Good Clinical Laboratory Practice (Institute of Tropical Medicine, Antwerpen, Belgium)
  4. Ethics in Health Research (MRCZ)
  5. Entomology Training (USAID)

Background:
  • Medical Laboratory Training Coordinator
  • Head Clinical Laboratory Services
  • Education Committee Member Medical Laboratory and Clinical Scientists Council

Work experience:
  1. Arbo Unie, Occupational Health Laboratories, Amsterdam, the Netherlands
  2. Medical Laboratory Services, Dr.GPT. Barclay / Dr. ME. Chitiyo, Baines Avenue, Harare, Zimbabwe
  3. Clinical Laboratory, Medical Chambers, Harare, Zimbabwe
  4. Holy Family Hospital Laboratory, New Delhi, India
  5. Deborah Retief Memorial Hospital, Mochudi, Botswana
  6. Binnengasthuis, University of Amsterdam, the Netherlands

MR. GARIKAI MALUNGA

Email: malungag@africau.edu

Ext: 1162

Academic Qualifications
  • MSc Degree in Clinical Biochemistry, University of Zimbabwe (2012)
  • BSc Degree in Biochemistry and Mathematics, University of Zimbabwe (1999)
  • Diploma in Medical Laboratory Sciences, ZIMLS (2007)
  • Graduate Certificate in Education, University of Zimbabwe (2002)
  • Certificate in Research Methodology, CHS-UZ (2011)
  • Certificate in Good Clinical Practice and Research Ethics, MRCZ (2015)
  • Certificate in ISO 9001-2008 QMS Internal Auditing, Standards Association of Zimbabwe (2011)
Achievements:
  1. Presented my research at the 2012 Annual Medical Research Day in Harare
  2. Second Best presenter at 2016 Zimbabwe Annual Scientific Conference( ZASCO)
Areas Of Interest
  1. New cancer markers for prostate and cervical cancer
  2. Efficient diagnosis of Malaria

Malunga G1, Mujaji WB, Musarurwa C, Nyamayaro T. (2012) Effect of Stalanev treatment on plasma lactate levels in adults attending Beatrice Road Infectious Diseases Hospital and Wilkins Infectious Diseases Hospital Opportunistic Infections Clinics in Harare. Central African Journal of Medicine 58 (1/4), 22-25

MR. ELLIOT CHIKAKA

Email: chikakae@africau.edu

Ext: 1163

Academic Qualifications
  • Masters in Biostatistics, University of Zimbabwe, Harare (2010)
  • BSc Degree in Mathematics & Statistics, Zimbabwe Open University (2005)
  • Certificate in Education, Hillside Teachers’ College (1989) Professional Competence in Computers-Computer Educational Services College
  • Basic Statistics and Data Analysis Course - Biomedical Research & Training Institute (BRTI)
  • Ethics in Health Research - Biomedical Research & Training Institute (BRTI)
  • Qualitative Data Analysis using Nvivo - Unique Methods Consultants (UMC))
Achievements:
  1. Collaborated with other colleagues in making publications and some under review. Spearheading the University-wide Research Methods Course.
  2. Coordinating and starting the MPH Part-Time programmes in Harare and Mutare.
Areas Of Interest

Application of statistical methods in the biological, medical, agricultural and environmental sciences, as well as the study of statistical methodology concerning problems and statistical areas originating from such scientific fields.

  1. An evaluation of 2005-2006 Zimbabwe Demographic and Health Survey HIV Prevalence Estimates for Bias Due To Non-Response.
  2. Best Practices for Providing Psychosocial Support (BPPSS) to Orphans and Vulnerable Children
  3. Institutional Factors Associated with Maternal Mortality That Occurred from 1 January to 31 December 2013 at Major Admitting Health Facilities in Midlands Province, Zimbabwe
  4. CARERS IN NEED OF CARE: Assessment of burnout among health care professionals involved in chronic disease management in the public health sector in Manicaland Province, Zimbabwe